Magical “science” and scientific magic

Posted on December 14, 2011


Magical Science
In the week that we finally have the first inklings of what might one day be a result in the search for the Higg’s boson from CERN and the European Space Agency gives up on the ill-fated and ill-named “Phobos-Grunt” Russian mission to Mars we discover yet another example of the ludicrous in pseudoscience. It seems we can never escape the nonsense no matter how hard real scientists try to.

Blinded by Science

Model of Phobos Grunt's base section that serv...In this issue we look at the relatively new book “Blinded by Science” which seems to be neither blinding nor even remotely related to science. Though perhaps that last is unfair, since the author claims to be related to two Professors of Medicine. What a shame they could not have persuaded their son and brother to stop wasting his time and ours putting forward complete nonsense about “vibrational energy” and “emotional storage” effects of water.

Out of nowhere

While the magical thinking shown in the new book seems to, sadly, still be with us in our modern world some real scientific magic has been announced this week. The long-known Casimir Effect which shows virtual particles are as real as Dirac’s work predicted has been extended in a highly complex experiment involving working with near light-speed effects and has pulled quite real photon pairs from out of nowhere. We really can, it seems, get something from nothing.

Small early stars

English: Projected density plot of a redshift ...

Along with pulling photons from empty space, it has also been found that the earliest empty space of all may have been filled with stars far smaller than the bloated monsters previously thought to make up the earliest lights in the sky. Still some forty times the size of our own sun, these smaller stars appear at last able to explain the relative proportions of matter found in the universe today.

Now, if they can just explain what dark matter is and where it came from…

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Posted in: Editorial